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  1. #31
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    I agree, I have made the decision to homeschool my dd, and am always looking for info to help answer the questions that I haven't even formed yet. you ladies are awesome!!!

    another question, how do you usually start homeschooling? was it incidental to how the day went or was it active and intentful?
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by gypsymom View Post
    another question, how do you usually start homeschooling? was it incidental to how the day went or was it active and intentful?
    It depends on what your intention is. Are you looking to “school at home“? ie, use a curriculum and dedicate a portion of each day to dedicated learning? I can't really speak to that, but perhaps others can.

    For us, as unschoolers, nothing really changed in our day to day routines. We just go with the flow, we don't use a curriculum and we don't do any “formal“ school work. We just go about our lives as we would without formal schooling as part of it. So there was no “transition“ period from say, the “preschooler“ age to what we would know as “school“ age.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by dressage mom View Post
    For us, as unschoolers, nothing really changed in our day to day routines. We just go with the flow, we don't use a curriculum and we don't do any “formal“ school work. We just go about our lives as we would without formal schooling as part of it. So there was no “transition“ period from say, the “preschooler“ age to what we would know as “school“ age.
    This is what our lives were like until the two of my three hit the early teens. At that point, each of them in turn started to focus more seriously on academics. For my oldest, this meant a lot of independent study, and eventually the decision to do some high school. Now my second has asked me to teach him high school math and works avidly at practical mechanics indepedently and while he is WELL beyond anything I could teach him there, I find that between what we are covering in math and my scant knowledge of science and history of science, I am able to relate those fields well enough to give him many directions to take his independent study.

    They both started to become more serious about furthering their academics on their own. They construct their day themselves, consulting me about my schedule if they need me for anything.

    The last is now 11 and very very interested in computer programming. His brother (#2)has been telling him he is going to need to be a math ninja to program and while he hasnt begun to ask me to help him yet, I can see the wheels are already turning.

    So all that was to say that you dont actually have to structure it for them. They will learn the basics in daily life and the structure will be interest driven by the child as he/she begins to find their interests and abilities. I think the method, unschooling, was instrumental in not only allowing my kids the freedom to find and develop their own strengths without the infererence of testing and coerced learning, but in allowing me to develop the close relationship neccessary to guide them and for them to trust me enough to be guided.
    Last edited by Ana; 07-27-2011 at 08:18 AM.

  4. #34
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    I like the idea of unschooling, and seem to be leaning more towards that than a structured programming, especially since i'm not huge on structure...although we do go to enough “playgroups“ that we are busy 4 days a week.

    I also would love input from all of you on how to handle those in my family (like my formally educated teacher of a sister and conventional parents) that doesn't agree with homeschooling. I have had issues in the past that I find hard to stand up to them, and need to fill my arsenal

    thanks
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  5. #35
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    Have you joined A Different Drum yahoo group? They have monthly meetings for homeschoolers to hang out and discuss this sort of thing. Not that this isnt a great venue too...just its probably a good idea to get out there into the Real Life community too.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hecate View Post
    Have you joined A Different Drum yahoo group? They have monthly meetings for homeschoolers to hang out and discuss this sort of thing. Not that this isnt a great venue too...just its probably a good idea to get out there into the Real Life community too.
    I need to get on that group. Hubby and I had disagreements on this school business last night I dislike disagreements LOL

    Candace~ Christ-clinging, babywearing, tiedying, barefoot, nature loving, crunchy mamma of three~

  7. #37
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    Ask him to post any of his questions here, if he likes. We're happy to talk about this stuff all day.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

  8. #38
    Expert Forum User The Ultimate London Mom! eversoclever's Avatar
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    My plan is to do a mash-up. We're going to emphasize music, through weekly music therapy, transitioning into lessons as his comfort level increases. Because of his strong interest and aptitude, I'm very supportive of conservatory teaching if he continues to show interest.

    We're keeping him in daycare part-time to work on his social skills and give me respite.

    I have not settled on a curriculum at this point. He is a strong reader, loves maps and computers. I've combed online curriculums, but haven't found one that I'm happy with. I'm still thinking it over.

    He's still very young, of course. Most of what he's learning is through play, therapy and light reading. We spend a lot of time at the library. I just don't want to lay out the money on a curriculum at this point. I'm sure the answer will come to me. Getting on homeschooling forums and yahoo groups has helped a lot.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by eversoclever View Post
    My plan is to do a mash-up. We're going to emphasize music, through weekly music therapy, transitioning into lessons as his comfort level increases. Because of his strong interest and aptitude, I'm very supportive of conservatory teaching if he continues to show interest.

    We're keeping him in daycare part-time to work on his social skills and give me respite.

    I have not settled on a curriculum at this point. He is a strong reader, loves maps and computers. I've combed online curriculums, but haven't found one that I'm happy with. I'm still thinking it over.

    He's still very young, of course. Most of what he's learning is through play, therapy and light reading. We spend a lot of time at the library. I just don't want to lay out the money on a curriculum at this point. I'm sure the answer will come to me. Getting on homeschooling forums and yahoo groups has helped a lot.
    Thats awesome, thanks for sharing that with us!
    I gotta get on one of those groups. I just dont know I want to get on one and then get sooo much more excited just to have hubby never follow suit ykwim?
    Darn differences of opinion LOL

    Candace~ Christ-clinging, babywearing, tiedying, barefoot, nature loving, crunchy mamma of three~

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy View Post
    2) they know that your child is not truant.
    it's the law that children recieve an education. If the school board doesn't require are letter from those who have never attended school, how is it enforced that the parents are providing some sort of education? just something I'm wondering...i know a bit off topic.

  11. #41
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    Kristen, check out this link for more info:

    Legal Aspects of Home Education in Ontario

    Specifically,
    home-educated students are not required to attend school, assuming they are receiving satisfactory instruction. The Act does not attempt to define satisfactory instruction, but obviously, no more can be expected of homeschooling families that that which is deemed satisfactory in the public school system. Should a board form the opinion that a child is not receiving satisfactory instruction, then the Act provides that the Ministry (not the school board) may conduct an inquiry to determine whether the instruction is satisfactory. Unfortunately, the Ministry of Education and school board officials are under the impression that the state, in the form of the school boards, must excuse the child from school attendance. In fact, under the law, children are excused from school attendance by virtue of the fact that they are receiving satisfactory instruction at home, just as they are excused when they attend a private school.
    The school board’s only responsibility, according to the Act, is to report to the Ministry the number of school-age children in its jurisdiction not attending public school, and the reasons therefore. Hence it is legitimate for a school board to contact a family and ask them why their school-age children are not attending school, but to go any further is beyond the requirements of the Act (and in fact, they can fulfill this obligation by using the census). If contacted, a family need answer only that they are providing instruction at home. (This same procedure holds true for families whose children attend private schools, although, for some mysterious reason, they are rarely, if ever, contacted.)
    School officials also sometimes maintain that “someone,” (read, a school official) must determine whether or not the instruction the child is receiving is satisfactory. No where does the law require this. In Canada, the courts presume one to be innocent until proven guilty. Case law has made it clear that with regard to Ontario law and homeschooling, parents must be presumed to be providing satisfactory instruction. Parents can not be presumed to be providing unsatisfactory instruction. This is tantamount to a presumption of guilt. Therefore there are no legal grounds, except in cases in which there is reason to believe otherwise, for the state to question whether satisfactory instruction is being provided. Where there is such reason, the law provides for the procedure of an inquiry.
    Last edited by dressage mom; 07-27-2011 at 10:54 PM.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

  12. #42
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    Yep, we're “innocent until proven guilty“ of educational neglect, just as we're “innocent until proven guilty“ of nutritional neglect, theft, manslaughter, video piracy, or any other crimes. People in our country aren't subjected to unwarranted search and seizure to check “just in case“ they're committing theft without just reason to suspect them of doing so; you don't have authorities coming by and investigating your family to make sure that you're not failing to nourish your children adequately just because you choose to feed them yourselves at home (instead of through private restaurants and/or a government-run child-nutrition program); police don't stop by and randomly investigate your home just to make sure you don't happen to be running a grow op in your basement; and families who are educating their children themselves are not to be subject to routine inspection of their private homes, family lives, and educational practices “just in case“ they may actually be committing educational neglect. The law mandates that we must provide our children with an education; it does not mandate that we must routinely prove our innocence of failing to do so.
    Last edited by Ceili; 07-28-2011 at 10:53 AM.
    formerly Kathy

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy View Post
    you don't have authorities coming by and investigating your family to make sure that you're not failing to nourish your children adequately just because you choose to feed them yourselves at home (instead of through private restaurants and/or a government-run child-nutrition program);
    Love this analogy Kathy.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

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