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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by eversoclever View Post
    OK, here is a portion of an email I received from another homeschooling parent about this stuff, partially censored.



    Hope this helps.

    It does, thankyou I do appreciate it, the more information I have the better

    Candace~ Christ-clinging, babywearing, tiedying, barefoot, nature loving, crunchy mamma of three~

  2. #17
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    Mrs. Crunchy: Yep, just put “homeschooling“, “educating at home“, “providing with satisfactory instruction at home“, or the like. Don't specify “unschooling“ instead of “homeschooling“. Unschooling is simply one approach to homeschooling: it is still “homeschooling“, as much as other homeschooling approaches are. You don't need to (and shouldn't) specify that you will be unschooling any more than you would specifically write that you would be Charlotte Mason homeschooling, classical homeschooling (eg, following the “Well-Trained Mind“ technique), eclectic homeschooling, taking a unit studies approach, following the Sonlight curriculum, or any other specific homeschooling style. Specifically how you intend to home-educate your child(ren) is beyond the scope of what the school boards need to know. They simply need to know that you intend to provide for your child's education yourselves, so that 1) they know that they are not responsible for providing your child with schooling and 2) they know that your child is not truant.

    Besides, as homeschooling is inherently flexible, many families' homeschooling styles vary and evolve over time to suit their needs and families anyway: they may start out unschooling but later start using a more structured, parent-selected curriculum for one or more aspects of their children's educations, or they may start out using a structured style and/or curriculum and then gravitate more towards unschooling, or they may start out Waldorf style and then decide that unit studies are a better fit for them, or whatever. All these details are irrelevant to the school board: as long as you're continuing to provide your child with an education, that's all that matters. So just call it "homeschooling", as that term encompasses all those variations and will continue to be an accurate description regardless of how your family's personal home-educating journey ends up unfolding.

    ESC: That is awesomely useful info, and, as well as being mentioned here, totally deserves its own dedicated thread so that other homeschooling LondonMoms can find that information if/when they need it.
    Last edited by Ceili; 07-23-2011 at 09:13 PM.
    formerly Kathy

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy View Post
    Mrs. Crunchy: Yep, just put “homeschooling“, “educating at home“, “providing with satisfactory instruction at home“, or the like. Don't specify “unschooling“ instead of “homeschooling“. Unschooling is simply one approach to homeschooling: it is still “homeschooling“, as much as other homeschooling approaches are. You don't need to (and shouldn't) specify that you will be unschooling any more than you would specifically write that you would be Charlotte Mason homeschooling, classical homeschooling (eg, following the “Well-Trained Mind“ technique), eclectic homeschooling, taking a unit studies approach, following the Sonlight curriculum, or any other specific homeschooling style. Specifically how you intend to home-educate your child(ren) is beyond the scope of what the school boards need to know. They simply need to know that you intend to provide for your child's education yourselves, so that 1) they know that they are not responsible for providing your child with schooling and 2) they know that your child is not truant.

    Besides, as homeschooling is inherently flexible, many families' homeschooling styles vary and evolve over time to suit their needs and families anyway: they may start out unschooling but later start using a more structured, parent-selected curriculum for one or more aspects of their children's educations, or they may start out using a structured style and/or curriculum and then gravitate more towards unschooling, or they may start out Waldorf style and then decide that unit studies are a better fit for them, or whatever. All these details are irrelevant to the school board: as long as you're continuing to provide your child with an education, that's all that matters. So just call it “homeschooling“, as that term encompasses all those variations and will continue to be an accurate description regardless of how your family's personal home-educating journey ends up unfolding.

    ESC: That is awesomely useful info, and, as well as being mentioned here, totally deserves its own dedicated thread so that other homeschooling LondonMoms can find that information if/when they need it.
    THANKS!!!!!!!!!
    and yes I agree that info should be stickied somewhere

    Candace~ Christ-clinging, babywearing, tiedying, barefoot, nature loving, crunchy mamma of three~

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by “the letter ESC quoted“
    The following is a list of some of the reasons that may give a board cause to investigate a particular instance of home schooling:
    It should be noted, however, that according to the Ontario Education Act, the school board does not actually have the legal right to investigate homeschooling families. According to the Act, the only one with the legal right to investigate a homeschooling family is the Provincial School Attendance Counsellor or his/her appointed representative(s), and it is specified in the Act that the councellor's appointed representative(s) for this purpose must not be employees of the board that operates the school that the child has the right to attend. ( Education Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. E.2 ) I'm sure that the school board could likely request that the Attendance Counsellor investigate a family, but the school board (or any employee thereof) does not have the legal right to investigate homeschooling families in their district themselves (which, since the local school board receives funding for each enrolled student, is a direct conflict of interest). As such, the “investigation“ clause of PPM 131 goes against the Education Act: but PPM 131 is merely Ministry of Education policy (with which homeschoolers have no legal compulsion to comply), whereas the Ontario Education Act is law (and thus everyone, the school board included, must comply with it). Thus, the Education Act overrules PPM 131; homeschoolers are under no obligation to submit to an attempted investigation from the local school board.

    Not that the board should be likely to try to investigate your family, Mrs.C.; in all likelihood, you'll submit your letter of intent, and that'll be the end of it (for each year, anyway). But just in case (for any homeschooling family that might be reading this thread, not just yours), it's good to be aware of your rights.
    formerly Kathy

  5. #20
    Expert Forum User The Ultimate London Mom! eversoclever's Avatar
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    I'm glad you clarified that, Kathy. Thanks!

  6. #21
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    In my letter, because I wasn't following a curriculuum but didn't really consider us unschoolers (because I made up lesson plans and had a sort of agenda set, roughly) I just said something like “I'm writing to inform you ds is being removed from the school system and will be educated at home.“
    I figured it covered my bases pretty good.
    Later the school requested samples of his work etc LMAO and I ignored it.
    DD1 age 7 DS age 11
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  7. #22
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    Kathy, If I could rep you 100 I would. You have been a lot of help thankyou .. all of you have been. I appreciate it very much

    Candace~ Christ-clinging, babywearing, tiedying, barefoot, nature loving, crunchy mamma of three~

  8. #23
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    I second what Kathy said.
    Last edited by Ana; 07-25-2011 at 05:41 AM.

  9. #24
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    I don't want to hijack the thread but I have a quick question that I bet someone reading this thread knows the answer to.

    I know very little about homeschooling and am wondering what happens when a homeschooled child wishes to go to college or university. What process is used? Since no grades were achieved through a school, how does this process work? Just curious. I've always wondered and thought this was a good chance to ask.

  10. #25
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    Melissa, I'll keep my reply brief as to not hijack Crunchy's thread (although you could start your own, dedicated thread in here the homeschooling forum if you wanted to have a more in-depth discussion about the question, and/or other general homeschooling-curiosity questions), but homeschooled students can and do go on to university/college. The exact process varies by university; there are several routes that homeschoolers can take for post-secondary admission, and each institution will have their own admission policies and process for home-educated students (and, with the increasing popularity of homeschooling, universities and colleges are developing new, clear admission policies and processes specifically for homeschoolers all the time). So to gain admissions to a particular university or college, the homeschooled teen should inquire with the specific university/college that he/she has interest in attending, find out what that particular institution's requirements or preferences are for admitting homeschoolers, and then just set about meeting those requirements.
    Last edited by Ceili; 07-25-2011 at 09:27 AM.
    formerly Kathy

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy View Post
    Melissa, I'll keep my reply brief as to not hijack Crunchy's thread (although you could start your own, dedicated thread in here the homeschooling forum if you wanted to have a more in-depth discussion about the question, and/or other general homeschooling-curiosity questions), but homeschooled students can and do go on to university/college. The exact process varies by university; there are several routes that homeschoolers can take for post-secondary admission, and each institution will have their own admission policies and process for home-educated students (and, with the increasing popularity of homeschooling, universities and colleges are developing new, clear admission policies and processes specifically for homeschoolers all the time). So to gain admissions to a particular university or college, the homeschooled teen should inquire with the specific university and colleges that he/she has interest in attending, find out what those specific institutions' requirements or preferences are for admitting homeschoolers, and then just set about meeting those requirements.

    You guys can Hijack away. All the questions other people have Im sure are questions I have had or will have.
    I was actually reading about homeschooling and university somewhere the past couple of days. Someone was sayign that Harvard and Yale and stuff in the states accept homeschoolers. I was like “swwweeet“ (not that I am telling my kids to go to these places, <unless money starts to fall from the sky ROFL> but its nice to know that “well recognized universitys“ accept homeschoolers..thought that was pretty cool!!!)

    Candace~ Christ-clinging, babywearing, tiedying, barefoot, nature loving, crunchy mamma of three~

  12. #27
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    Yep, the “elite“ US colleges lurve homeschoolers. They don't just admit them; a number of them actively seek/prefer homeschooled students.

    ETA: Homeschooling (ie, in noticeably large numbers) is a bit newer/more recent in getting established in Canada than it is in the States, so some of our universities and colleges are still in the process of developing their homeschooling-specific admission policies (although homeschoolers can often find ways to gain admission with or without specific homeschooling admissions policies), but seeing as my oldest still has about 11 years to go before he's of the age to go to university, I'm not worried. Homeschoolers can/do go now; and it'll be all the easier and more straightforward by the time my kids (and yours) would be ready to go.
    Last edited by Ceili; 07-25-2011 at 09:52 AM. Reason: typo thanks to my lagbeast computer.
    formerly Kathy

  13. #28
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    I inquired at the admissions office at Western last fall. They said each homeschooled student applying to Western in considered individually. They are interviewed by the admissions department and their portfolio of previous work - school, volunteer and practical, any courses they took, any programs they took part in are considered.

    My daughter, who was unschooled, did partial high school to get her 6 grade 12 credits with which to apply. These are one way to prove oneself. She also took Psychology as an Advanced Placement in her final term, which is another way for the admissions office to gauge your ability.

    Every University in Ontario has a policy in place for homeschoolers and they have a reputation as good candidates. Colleges, suprisingly, are harder to get into without a HS diploma, but one can always wait until they are 19 and apply as a mature student. This is currently in flux as many students are finding if they work at it, talk to someone at the College, they are getting around the diploma requirement, but as yet these are just individual cases. I think in the next decade, we will see tremendous changes as the numbers of homeschooled kids has risen so dramatically.

    Tons of Canadian info here:

    http://www.rainsberger.ca/blog/unive...chool-diploma/
    Last edited by Ana; 07-26-2011 at 07:41 AM.

  14. #29
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    Just popping in to say what a WEALTH of info you ladies are! We arne't there yet, but have been considering options, and this info helps a lot!! Thanks!

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    loving this!!!!
    ~ Annie ~
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