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  1. #1
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    Default Homeschool groups in London??

    I'm a seasoned hs'er, for 16 yrs now, and I think i'd like to join a homeschool group again.. any suggestions? I prefer a general group where anyone is welcome. I don't want to have to sign a statement of faith or anything like that...

    Does anyone else belong to a hs group? Or know if there are any activities that hs'ers are welcome to "drop in" to?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Here's one...
    http://kidslearningconnections.yolasite.com/


    There is a yahoo group called A Different Drum, there are lots of activities posted there.
    Last edited by momx2; 03-01-2011 at 09:01 AM.
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    Senior Member rootedngrounded's Avatar
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    Default Any Charlotte Mason fans out there?

    I'm pursuing the idea of Charlotte Mason education for my kiddos (currently 3,1) and wondering if there are any groups out there reading her stuff, and working with her material?

    Also interested generally in how active London's homeschooling networks are.




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    There are monthly homeschooling chats at Chapters north.

    There is a local homeschooling yahoo group called A Different Drum, you will find a lot of contacts and information there.
    Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.~Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food
    If we want to move towards a low-polluting, sustainable society, we need to get consumers to think about their purchases-David Suzuki
    "You must be the change you want to see in the world"- Mahatma Gandhi

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    A Different Drum is the general, all-inclusive secular homeschooling group/network for the city. Participation is free and open to any homeschoolers (although some events that people organize and choose to do do cost money, of course).

    Kids Learning Connections is a co-operative group of homeschoolers in the area. They buy group insurance so that they can rent venues that require it. Thus, there is a fee associated with joining (for the insurance fees), plus fees associated with renting the places (which you pay into if choosing to participate in a given session). Families are also expected to help contribute to running the activities in some way as they are able, as the group is a co-operative. Like A Different Drum, KLC is secular/inclusive of all types of homeschoolers.

    Both groups/networks are on Yahoo Groups, so you can do a search there to find out more or contact the groups.
    Last edited by Ceili; 04-21-2012 at 01:24 PM.
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    Senior Member rootedngrounded's Avatar
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    Ceili - by 'secular' what exactly do you mean? there are different schools of thought on that. Are faith-based homeschoolers welcomed, or excluded from such a group?

    I am Christian, and when I read the 'secular' tag on Kids Learning Connections, I automatically counted myself out.

    Whereas A Different Drum specifically mentioned 'open to ALL modes of homeschooling' and didn't say secular, so I figured I was welcome.

    To be clear - I'm not unhappy grouping with those who aren't working from a faith-based foundation - absolutely delighted to befriend anyone - but I don't want to be snubbed or criticized for doing so in my own home, and hoping to find others to dialogue with and befriend who might also have a Christian faith foundation.

    To me, 'secular' does not mean 'inclusive'.

    I'd be interested in how these two groups are the same and different.




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    Quote Originally Posted by rootedngrounded View Post
    Ceili - by 'secular' what exactly do you mean? there are different schools of thought on that. Are faith-based homeschoolers welcomed, or excluded from such a group?

    I am Christian, and when I read the 'secular' tag on Kids Learning Connections, I automatically counted myself out.

    Whereas A Different Drum specifically mentioned 'open to ALL modes of homeschooling' and didn't say secular, so I figured I was welcome.

    To be clear - I'm not unhappy grouping with those who aren't working from a faith-based foundation - absolutely delighted to befriend anyone - but I don't want to be snubbed or criticized for doing so in my own home, and hoping to find others to dialogue with and befriend who might also have a Christian faith foundation.

    To me, 'secular' does not mean 'inclusive'.

    I'd be interested in how these two groups are the same and different.
    You need to review the definition of secular, because your interpretation is incorrect. Secular does not mean Atheistic, it means not connected to any religion. The only way something CAN be inclusive is to be secular, because the moment something isn't secular, by default it excludes someone. Do you feel excluded when you attend a secular ball game or eat at a secular restaurant or post on secular forums? Everything that is not religious is by definition secular.

    Since secular means the group is not based or founded on the principles of a single (or any religion), likely none of the activities would be religious in nature. Unlike many of the non-secular, heavily religious homeschooling groups in the USA, you don't have to sign a declaration of faith or proclaim belief in Jesus in order to be admitted. There would be no prayer prior to get together or activities (of course you can privately pray if you want). Proselytising to other people's kids would probably be frowned upon, and you might have a bad time if you don't 'believe' in evolution or other scientifically proven concepts and choose to attend a science fair. If you found other christians there, great, you guys could probably chat it up and even discuss your faith - but there is the expectation that you would be respectful to all and realize that there would be a variety of world views and opinions. That's secular.

    I'm part of a HUGE homeschooling group that is secular in nature. There are more religious people than not, though I can't be sure of this since religion is not discussed. I know many are muslim because they wear abaya and/or hijab. I know some are sikh and hindu from similar physical clues. My kid's best friends here are mormons, and I know there are a few christians as well. But the group is still secular because our meetings are not about religion, based on religion, or anyway shaped by religious doctrine. We come together so our kids can meet new people and enjoy group activities.
    Last edited by WateryTart; 05-29-2012 at 02:37 AM.

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    Senior Member rootedngrounded's Avatar
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    1. of or pertaining to worldly things or to things that are not regarded as religious, spiritual, or sacred; temporal: secular interests.
    2. not pertaining to or connected with religion ( opposed to sacred): secular music.

    3. (of education, a school, etc.) concerned with nonreligious subjects.

    4. (of members of the clergy) not belonging to a religious order; not bound by monastic vows ( opposed to regular).

    5. occurring or celebrated once in an age or century: the secular games of Rome.

    Interpreting 'secular', I think I'm within the range of meaning here. I'm not saying secular is atheistic, but that 'secular' clearly excludes religion. I looked up both homeschooling groups, saw that one defined itself as 'secular' and that the other defined itself as including everyone, and wondered if there was something under the surface there, and that was why they self-defined this way - whether one excluded religious folks and the other included them. I was not aware of the context of the large religious-based homeschooling groups in the States which require a faith statement to belong.

    That's the origin of my question.

    Secularism is a perspective that, in general, promotes tolerance but would prefer to limit the influence of religion to the home and to the personal and private spheres.

    As I'm considering homeschooling, I'll give it a test run in one or both of these groups, and see where I fit in. Generally, I'm an amiable welcoming kind of person, and find myself at home with most folks, so I'm not thinking it will be a huge problem in either place; but if I'm homeschooling from a faith-based foundation, I want that right to be respected and supported from my homeschooling network. I don't want to have to defend myself for those decisions within what I'd hope to be my safe space.







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    KLC homeschool group is inclusive to everyone.
    Last edited by momx2; 05-30-2012 at 01:49 PM.
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    thx. what's the difference between the two, then? Do people belong to both?
    Last edited by rootedngrounded; 05-30-2012 at 06:31 PM.




  11. #11
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    I thought Ceili definition was a pretty good.

    ADD is just an online yahoo group, kind of like a forum I think. It's full of homeschoolers in the area, some are further out of the area too, and anyone can read the board. So if you have a question about something you could post it on ADD and get many different views. If you wanted to plan a field trip and needed a minimum number of participants, you could find them on ADD. There is a mom on ADD who organizes a monthly chat, which is a nice way to connect with people.

    KLC (kids learning connection) is an actual group that works together to plan activities and meets on a regular basis. As stated they have insurance and therefore are able to rent venues to hold their gatherings. People in KLC also plan field trips for KLC families. Also the KLC board is private to the group, so the general public cannot read it. Here is KLC's website, they list past activities so you can see what has been done in the past.....
    http://kidslearningconnections.yolasite.com/

    There is yet another yahoo group, SOULL (Southern Ontario Unschooler's Loving Life), which also usually holds a monthly chat, and the date and time is usually posted on ADD as well.


    I think most people in KLC also participate on ADD because it offers different things.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ceili View Post
    A Different Drum is the general, all-inclusive secular homeschooling group/network for the city. Participation is free and open to any homeschoolers (although some events that people organize and choose to do do cost money, of course).

    Kids Learning Connections is a co-operative group of homeschoolers in the area. They buy group insurance so that they can rent venues that require it. Thus, there is a fee associated with joining (for the insurance fees), plus fees associated with renting the places (which you pay into if choosing to participate in a given session). Families are also expected to help contribute to running the activities in some way as they are able, as the group is a co-operative. Like A Different Drum, KLC is secular/inclusive of all types of homeschoolers.

    Both groups/networks are on Yahoo Groups, so you can do a search there to find out more or contact the groups.
    Last edited by momx2; 05-30-2012 at 07:09 PM.
    Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.~Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food
    If we want to move towards a low-polluting, sustainable society, we need to get consumers to think about their purchases-David Suzuki
    "You must be the change you want to see in the world"- Mahatma Gandhi

  12. #12
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    Secular was put in the definition of KLC to differentiate it from other homeschool co-ops in the area which are all faith based. (you must sign a statement of faith with them).
    KLC is more inclusive because it accepts everyone. There are people who hold different beliefs but our reason for coming together is to provide a community for our kids and ourselves, and spaces for our kids to engage in different activities.
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