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Thread: Cross-eyed

  1. #1
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    Default Cross-eyed

    DS is very cross-eyed still. I know dd was cross-eyed also as a baby but I think it had corrected itself by now. DS is 5 months old now...should I be concerned??

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    sarabrydges
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    I honestly can't give you a good answer on this, but I would speak to my doctor about it if you are concerned. It can't hurt!

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    I know with dd he said if it hadn't corrected by a certain age to see him. He hasn't mentioned it with ds and I don't remember the age. I guess I will wait till his next appointment.

    Thanks

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    Is he crossed all the time? Alice goes cross eyed/ or maybe lazy eye when she's tired...I was going to bring it up at my next Dr apt. I read somewhere that they may do eye patch treatment...the baby wears a patch on the weaker eye at home while playing. Eventually it goes away. After a month or so depending on the severity.
    Motherhood Rocks!

    Baby Alice, May 15/06

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    He is cross eyed quite a bit...when it's not crossed completely I notice that the left seems to cross more (so lazy??). I tried to do a little photo shoot with him and he's crossed in pretty much all the pictures. When it's just his left eye, if I cover his right he will move his left. His next Dr appointment is in March, so I think I will wait until then.

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    My son was a little crossed eyed (or lazy eye) when he was little. If you don't patch it before 8 years of age their is not much chance of it fixing itself. Also be careful what type of patch you use as they can really hurt the skin around the eye. We didn't use the premade ones as they ripped his skin and left it raw. He's still fairly young and his muscles are still strengthening but be safe and ask now. Better to start early.




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    Just thought I would update.

    We are seeing the ophthalmologist tomorrow morning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by momofallboys
    My son was a little crossed eyed (or lazy eye) when he was little. If you don't patch it before 8 years of age their is not much chance of it fixing itself.
    My optomitrist (sp?) said it is age 6 yrs. After that there isn't anything they can do. Cassie's was jusr found at the end of March...and she was almost 11! Poor girl couldn't even read the 70 line.

    ETA: One eye turning in is not "lazy eye", but rather something that can cause it. My daughter's eyes always looked normal.

    Amblyopia, commonly known as lazy eye, is the eye condition noted by reduced vision not correctable by glasses or contact lenses and is not due to any eye disease. The brain, for some reason, does not fully acknowledge the images seen by the amblyopic eye. This almost always affects only one eye but may manifest with reduction of vision in both eyes. It is estimated that three percent of children under six have some form of amblyopia.

    Causes of Lazy Eye
    Anything that interferes with clear vision in either eye during the critical period (birth to 6 years of age) can cause amblyopia. The most common causes of amblyopia are constant strabismus (constant turn of one eye), anisometropia (different vision/prescriptions in each eye), and/or blockage of an eye due to cataract, trauma, lid droop, etc.

    Amblyopia is a neurologically active process. In other words, the loss of vision takes place in the brain. If one eye sees clearly and the other sees a blur, the brain can inhibit (block, ignore, suppress) the eye with the blur. The brain can also suppress one eye to avoid double vision. The inhibition process (suppression) can result in a permanent decrease in the vision in the blurry eye that can not be corrected with glasses, lenses, or lasik surgery.
    Many people make the mistake of saying that a person who has a crossed or turned eye (strabismus) has a "lazy eye," but lazy eye (amblyopia) and strabismus are not the same condition. Some of the confusion may be due to the fact that strabismus can cause amblyopia. Amblyopia can result from a constant unilateral strabismus (i.e., either the right or left eye turns all of the time). Alternating or intermittent strabismus (an eye turn which occurs only some of the time) rarely causes amblyopia.

    While a deviating eye (strabismus) may be easily spotted by the layman, amblyopia without strabismus or associated with a small deviation usually can be not noticed by either you or your pediatrician. Only an eye doctor comfortable in examining young children and infants can detect this type of amblyopia. This is why early infant and pre-school eye examinations are so necessary.

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    I was born crossed eye. I had corrective surgery at 2. I thought ds#1 was going to need the same thing, but our dr was great. We waited it out, and we kept doing regular checks and all is well.

    DS#2 still goes a little crossed eye, but not nearly as much or as badly as he did when he was first born.

    I wouldn't be concerned about it. I still go a little crossed when I'm super tired, but otherwise no one would know!

    If you're concerned about it, by all means take him to the DRs And have an opthamologist(sp?) take a look( probably the better of the two options) Dr. Forristal is Amazing

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    DD is cross-eyed...our GP suspected something at 21 months and off to the pediatric opthamolagist we went....she has been wearing glasses during the day and than we slip a cloth patch over her good eye for an hour in the evening.....there is a great optical place at wellington and commissioners by Caseys' Kreative Kitchens that specializes in childrens glasses and accessories and is very reasonable...it is called Gilhams Optical if you are in need of her.



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    Hope all goes well at the Opthamologist. Are you seeing Dr. Orton?


    My daugter got glasses at just over a year for strabismus as well as for farsightedness. Her eyes crossed all the time until we got the glasses.
    The poster formerly known as Geomamma

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    We are in St Thomas so we saw Dr Brydon. He is referring DS to a pediatric ophthalmologist in London since Dr Brydon doesn't do the surgery enough on children. He said there are 2 in London - but the one is leaving? and the other is retiring. He hopes that the retiring Dr will take DS - if he won't I have to go to Toronto for it. I really hope we can just go to London for this.

    He said if not corrected by 9 years the brain "forgets" how to use the eye properly.

    My family Dr thought the right eye was worse...I couldn't decide.....today the ophthalmologist said it was his left that was worse....but he crosses both (which is what I thought - but since he does both it was hard for myself to tell which was worse).

    DD was cross-eyed as a baby but her eyes looked normal by about 4 months (I think) - I was told at the time that was normal but the person who took down information before we saw the Dr seemed surprised when i said her's corrected on it's own (since my family Dr said it can correct on it's own) - so I hope that her's is ok.

    I have a nephew (6) and a niece (3) who both have glasses for a "lazy eye" my niece was very mild (hardly noticeable) while my nephew is extremely noticeable if he takes off his glasses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geomamma
    Hope all goes well at the Opthamologist. Are you seeing Dr. Orton?
    We have an appointment with Dr Orton in July! Yeah I don't have to go to Toronto....

    Is he good/nice?

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    Yes, he is very nice, and his orthoptic team is always friendly (we see the orthoptics people every 3 or 4 months, and Dr. O once a year). He's older and is silly with the kids. I find he's rushed a bit though (he sees so many kids) so make sure you ask all your questions!!
    The poster formerly known as Geomamma

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    Thanks.

    I totally understand that Dr's are rushed!

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