Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Expert Forum User
    Mommymanda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    8,630
    Rep Power
    462

    Default Question for homeschoolers

    First I'll admit I know nothing, so I do apologize if I ask something that seems offensive.

    I just wonder...when homeschooling do you need to register with a school board for a curriculum or can you just do as you please?

    I ask because I have a friend with a special needs child. She became very frustrated with the systems lack of support for her child and pulled her from school to homeschool. The problem is she works full days and she has commented a few times that her husbands idea of homeschooling is to put Dora on or sing the ABCs.

    Her child is now seven, and I worry about the child is not getting the education she needs.
    A by the book mama to a completley healthy DD Dec.2002 and doing it all different, BWng, CDing, BLWing, crunchy mama to an equally healthy DS Nov.2008 apparently a cosleeping mama DS Aug. 2011

  2. #2
    Expert Forum User
    dressage mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,935
    Rep Power
    277

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mommymanda View Post
    I just wonder...when homeschooling do you need to register with a school board for a curriculum or can you just do as you please?
    No, you don't have to do anything like that at all. When pulling a child out of school, they simply require a letter of intent, ie., “My child won't be here anymore b/c we're homeschooling“ but it is not permission, and it isn't an invitation for the school board to check up on you or your child.

    But no, you don't have to register for a curriculum, and you don't have to follow one at all.

    I ask because I have a friend with a special needs child. She became very frustrated with the systems lack of support for her child and pulled her from school to homeschool. The problem is she works full days and she has commented a few times that her husbands idea of homeschooling is to put Dora on or sing the ABCs.
    Well, I don't see a problem with that, to be honest, unless he abandons her in front of the tv from morning till dusk; but I highly doubt that's happening is it?

    There's a lot to be said for “de-schooling“, ie, letting her just chill for awhile and get “school“ out of her system. That's likely the best scenario, esp. if she's had a traumatic time at school.

    Her child is now seven, and I worry about the child is not getting the education she needs.
    What do you mean by “education“? Do you mean a school-type setting where she is doing school-type work? There are many paths to learning, and this style of education is simply one of them. Kids thrive in an environment where stuff is accessible, yet not necessarily forced on them. Does she get read to, does she get play time, etc. etc. Is there active engagement from adults (not necessarily in terms of “school time“ or "teaching time", but just in relating to her, talking to her, being with her)? These things are so important -- MUCH more important than worksheets or drills, etc.
    Last edited by dressage mom; 12-12-2009 at 08:13 AM.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    118
    Rep Power
    22

    Default

    Well said dressage mom! And remember too it takes some time to find your groove when home learning, at least for us it has. We are new to it this year and learning as we go along. It isn't something that is like ok we are home learning now and this is how it is going to look and have a set schedule or something. At least we are not doing it that way, I know some families like to have a set schedule but so far we are keeping it loose and it seems to be working for us.
    For me that is one of the things that is so great about home learning the flexibility and freedom to tailor it to what works best for my DD who is 6. And to remember that what works best for us as a family may not be what works best for someone else's family!

  4. #4
    Expert Forum User The Ultimate London Mom!
    Ingalls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    london
    Posts
    22,762
    Rep Power
    1245

    Default

    Well said dressage mom
    I also want to point out that just because she works all day, doesn't mean the homeschooling has to be left all to the father who's at home. I worked f/t when we started homeschooling ds. DH is home with them. Most of the planned aspects of his work I plan out and for example, I teach him something in the evening around eight pm, and we do some work with it and he has an assignment the next day to do that is related to it. Daddy's there for help if he needs it, but he knows the concept because we covered it in the evenin.g
    No one says learning has to happen from 9-4 kwim?
    Or DH finds ways to teach him stuff that I don't know or wouldn't have thought of, like computer stuff, geography and map stuff. They do things like that in the daytime, but they aren't 'school stuff'. They're just part of their day and educational.

    DD loves the leap frog toy on the fridge and the movie Letter Factory. She could hardly speak more than a few phrases at age two, and at two and a half she nkows all the sounds for the letters, their names, and can identify them in capital and small for the most part. Not too bad! But honestly? Most of that she learned from Leap Frog.
    We do go through her blocks and sa y“ooh the A block. A says Aaaaah! Apple, alligator“ etc but the real reason she cared was because it's easier to sing along to her movie if she knows all the letters

    Don't judge too harshly. The mom might be exagerating, or not know the whole story because she isn't home.

    We have not glanced at the curriculuum since September and we have stuff we do every day for ds and he's learning. I have no idea if he's learning what his peers are. I just know that he is excited to learn, and loves when I say “time to do some homework“ and that to me, says it all.

    He can identify the verb, adjectives, nouns, pronouns, etc in sentences. He can read really well and loves to write stories. He can do division and multiplication (though this is more challenging to him). He can't tell ya the time, tie his shoes or cut a darn pork chop without it flying across the room but he knows how to operate a jigsaw, drill and do drywall. He knows how to read a map and find where we are, how far it is to gramma's, how long that would take to get there and write down a route to take. He knows how to read a recipe and measure ingredients to cook. It's give and take.
    It balances out in time.
    DD1 age 7 DS age 11
    "I will remember you." July/10
    Baby Elaina born October 28th, 2011. Making every single day that much more special.
    INTERESTED IN BUYING DVDS OF OLD KIDS' SHOWS. Mr.Rogers', Mr.Dressup, Polka Dot Door, etc

  5. #5
    Expert Forum User
    dressage mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,935
    Rep Power
    277

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by *allie* View Post
    No one says learning has to happen from 9-4 kwim?
    This is another great point that shouldn't be missed. Children are learning all. the. time. There is no schedule to it, yk?

    Or DH finds ways to teach him stuff that I don't know or wouldn't have thought of, like computer stuff, geography and map stuff. They do things like that in the daytime, but they aren't 'school stuff'. They're just part of their day and educational.

    ... He can't tell ya the time, tie his shoes or cut a darn pork chop without it flying across the room but he knows how to operate a jigsaw, drill and do drywall. He knows how to read a map and find where we are, how far it is to gramma's, how long that would take to get there and write down a route to take. He knows how to read a recipe and measure ingredients to cook. It's give and take.
    It balances out in time.
    This is brilliant, thanks for sharing. And I find that this is exactly our experience, as well. We do not follow a curriculum, we don't take part in any “prescribed“ educational “plan“, if you will. There is a flow to our day, though -- and I will be honest, some of that IS television (actually, it's videos or youtube since we dont' have cable) and we're okay with that.

    But the other day dd created a scavenger hunt for me, all on her own. I had no idea WHAT she was doing. But she made up this “treasure“, and wrapped it, then took about an hour to draw a map for me to follow. I have NEVER sat down with her and told her or shown her how to do this. She created it all on her own; what an accomplishment! Which goes to show that kids ARE motivated and ARE creative and DO learn pretty darn important skills without being forced to do so.

    Learning is imagination.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Wethree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,557
    Rep Power
    102

    Default

    ditto to everything that has been said far.

    I do have a question though..you said the child has special needs?..what are they?

  7. #7
    Expert Forum User

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    heading home and soon!
    Posts
    4,931
    Rep Power
    258

    Default

    Everything was said here so well.... I purchased a curriculum that we do go to every now and then because my daughter loves the stories. I have been accused of not teaching my child enough life skills... apparently knowing all the continents is not a life skill... maybe not... but just because she has special needs doesn't mean she can't learn other things... oops looks like this is turning into a vent... sorry about that.

    How old it the child? What are their special needs? I am homeschooling my special needs daughter who is totally fascinated with the things of the world... hence the continents.... she loves her globe and looking for places on it.
    ~ Annie ~
    Mom to 4 (B24, G23, G19, G9)

    My Blog: It's just my life...
    Follow me on Twitter: @anniecannie

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Whitehills
    Posts
    1,067
    Rep Power
    67

    Default

    I agree with Dressage Mom. Children do not need to be force fed information in order to learn. There is learning all around us. The problem with society is that we have been brainwashed to think the only way a child can learn is to sit at a desk in a classroom. Not so. My kids are proof as are many of the kids of ladies here.

  9. #9
    Expert Forum User

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,197
    Rep Power
    162

    Default

    I have to agree with the others and would like to add that, with all due respect (and I mean this kindly), it can be really hard for someone on the outside of a family/household to get an accurate picture or idea of what's happening educationally within a homeschooling family. It may look like the family's “not doing anything“, but in reality they are most often nurturing the children just fine according to the children's needs. (Even if the mom makes quips about “homeschooling by watching Dora“ or whatnot.)

    From an outsider's perspective, it may look like we don't “do“ much with our kids, because we don't follow a formal study program, but we communicate with our children and support them and they explore and ponder and figure things out, and our children are learning and having their educational needs met perfectly well.

    I appreciate that your concern comes from a good place, but this is the reason why it's the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their children are having their educational needs met, not the responsibility of the children's parents' friends or other people outside the family. The family in question are simply the only ones in the position to best judge how the children are doing and what they individually need -- whether or not that happens to look like “school“. Seeing as these are friends of yours, they must be good people, who love their child and want what is best for him/her. So trust them to provide that for their child and look out for his/her best interests. There's probably no one in the world that's more deeply vested in making sure that their child gets what (s)he needs than them.
    Last edited by Ceili; 12-16-2009 at 10:50 PM. Reason: typo
    formerly Kathy

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Whitehills
    Posts
    1,067
    Rep Power
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy View Post
    ......it can be really hard for someone on the outside of a family/household to get an accurate picture or idea of what's happening educationally within a homeschooling family. It may look like the family's “not doing anything“, but in reality they are most often nurturing the children just fine according to the children's needs.
    From an outsider's perspective, it may look like we don't “do“ much with our kids, because we don't follow a formal study program,
    Well said. My SIL is a teacher and my MIL was married to a teacher and I can sometimes tell by their questions and the way some things are said that they assume my kids are not “learning“. But nothing can be farther from the truth. You kind of have to be there in the day to day scene to get those “ah-hah“ moments when you child, in casual conversation, does math in her head to figure something out all on her own. Little things like this happen all the time and THAT is when you know they are learning. If you are not there to witness those moments then you can't possibly know.

    OP....just have faith that kid (all of us) are innately wired to learn. It's virtually impossible NOT to learn.

  11. #11
    Expert Forum User
    dressage mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,935
    Rep Power
    277

    Default

    I notice that the OP has never checked back in. Hmm.
    "Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are." -- Old English Saying

  12. #12
    Expert Forum User The Ultimate London Mom!
    princess2808's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wrapping in the Ghetto
    Posts
    22,299
    Rep Power
    1037

    Default

    Her computer is down at the moment.... so I think she isnt on for long spans as she has to go on on breaks at work.
    Mommy to DS Jan '06, DD July '09, DS Feb '11, DD Dec '12
    Wife to my wonderful DH of 8 years
    http://handsbetterfull.blogspot.com/

Similar Threads

  1. Show off your talents to Homeschoolers
    By doulamom in forum Chit Chat
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-19-2009, 10:16 AM
  2. question for homeschoolers.
    By M2M in forum School Age
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-16-2009, 07:32 AM
  3. Are Working Homeschoolers
    By doulamom in forum Homeschooling families
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-12-2009, 05:05 PM
  4. Homeschoolers - Let's go to the splash pad!
    By feministmama in forum Get-Togethers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-18-2007, 05:51 PM
  5. Attention Homeschoolers! Question here!
    By bleuhorizons in forum Education
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-30-2007, 11:26 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •