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Thread: Normal, Healthy Infant Sleep Education - October 2 at London Convention Centre

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    Default Normal, Healthy Infant Sleep Education - October 2 at London Convention Centre

    Dr. James McKenna is presenting "Sleep Like A Baby? Through the Night? Medical and Cultural Misunderstandings of Normal, Healthy Infant Sleep (And What To Do About It)" at the LCC on October 2

    Birth and Beyond Conference An Evening with James McKenna - Thu Oct 2

    This lecture provides biological, developmental, historical, and data-based findings explaining how and why the traditional, culturally-based assumptions underlying pediatric infant sleep research only promise to perpetuate the very infant sleep problems these same researchers are asked to solve. As regards their infants sleep western parents have the dubious distinction of being the most well educated, but the most judgmental, exhausted, and least satisfied and disappointed parents on the planet! The reasons for this can be addressed by critiquing the iconic (all too familiar) image of a solitary, bottle fed infant sleeping solidly and “throughout the night” at very young ages, and thinking that this early consolidation of sleep for an infant is normal and healthy. The actual species –wide human arrangement is for infants to breastfeed, sleep in relatively short bouts, wake, and breastfeed again, all night long, while sleeping next to its mother’s body during the first year or so of life. I discuss here why the idea that infants need to be ‘sleep trained’ is fallacious, and is no more than a recent social invention that offers no lifetime skills or benefits to the infant and why it is not likely to be successful. Human infant sleep development is anything but linear as “sleeping through the night” ebbs and flows, so-to –speak, in relationship to a child’s developing cognitive, social and emotional needs during the first five or six years of life.

    $25 (if purchased online by Friday, September 26)

    $35 at the door (if space is available)

    About James McKenna
    Professor James J. McKenna is recognized as the world’s leading authority on mother-infant co-sleeping, in relationship to breastfeeding and SIDS. In recognition of his work in 2009 he was admitted as a Fellow into the select body of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's most prestigious scientific society. That same year and in recognition of his extensive work with television, radio, and print media he received from the American Anthropological Association the “2008 Anthropology In The Media Award” one of the top three awards presented to anthropologists by the association in recognition of his distinguished work in educating the public to the importance of anthropological concepts.

    He received his undergraduate degree in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1970, his Master's Degree from San Diego State University in 1972, and his Ph.D. in biological anthropology from the University of Oregon, Eugene, in 1975.

    After teaching anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley as a Visiting Assistant Professor for two years, he accepted a tenure track position (in anthropology) at Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he was awarded an Endowed Chair, and remained for twenty years. Recruited by the University of Notre Dame in 1997, since then, as was true at Pomona College, he has won every teaching prize he has been eligible for, including most recently the College of Arts and Letters highest teaching award, the Sheedy Award, 2008.

    Initially Professor McKenna specialized in studying the social behavior of monkeys and apes but the birth of his son in 1978 he began to apply the principles of human behavioral evolution to the understanding of human infancy. At the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Department of Neurology his research team pioneered the first studies of the physiology and behavior of mothers and infant sleeping together and apart, using physiological and behavioral recording devices.

    Professor McKenna has published over 139 refereed scientific articles in diverse medical and anthropological journals on co-sleeping, breastfeeding, evolutionary medicine and SIDS, and both here and abroad he gives over 20 lectures especially to pediatric groups and parents. Here in the United States he remains one of the primary spokesperson to the media on issues pertaining to sleeping arrangements, nighttime breast feeding and SIDS prevention.

    He has also published two monographs on SIDS and infant sleep, and co-edited two books:Evolutionary Medicine (published by Oxford in 1999) and Evolutionary Medicine And Health: New Perspectives, also with Oxford University Press. His first trade book for parents was published in 2008 entitled: Sleeping With Your Baby: A Parents Guide To Co-sleeping, and was recently translated and available in Spanish and Dutch.

    Dr. McKenna's Biography // Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory // University of Notre Dame

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    Ive learned that babies dont sleep through the night.
    Tutumom and LaLa like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie_ View Post
    Ive learned that babies dont sleep through the night.
    My first did at 8 weeks and never looked back. My second is 22 months and STILL gets up once a night. Thankfully all she wants is a bottle of water, but still.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie_ View Post
    Ive learned that babies dont sleep through the night.
    My first didn't until he was over a year. Changed my strategy for #2 and #2 and #3 both slept through the night by the time they were a month old....

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    Whats your strategy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie_ View Post
    Whats your strategy
    I put them down to sleep awake (but tired, clean, fed and happy) as much as possible right from the get-go. They did fuss a little every now and again, but unless there was something else (teething, colds, growth spurts, in which case all bets are off) they never cried at bedtime and slept through night pretty much from 1 month on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogomom View Post
    I put them down to sleep awake (but tired, clean, fed and happy) as much as possible right from the get-go. They did fuss a little every now and again, but unless there was something else (teething, colds, growth spurts, in which case all bets are off) they never cried at bedtime and slept through night pretty much from 1 month on.
    We've done that from the get-go with dd2 and she still gets up once a night at 22 months.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Layla'sMom View Post
    We've done that from the get-go with dd2 and she still gets up once a night at 22 months.
    I never said it worked for everyone - just that it worked for us for DS#2 and DS#3.
    I specifically decided to change my strategy after letting my oldest CIO at 18 months... I was back at work full time and couldn't deal with the lack of sleep anymore and I had to do something, but it was awful (the CIO night - only took one) so I did a lot of research about infant sleep before #2 was born and specifically decided on this strategy - I also made an effort to make this work from day #1, and would wake him up to put him to bed if he fell asleep in my arms or while BFing....

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogomom View Post
    I never said it worked for everyone - just that it worked for us for DS#2 and DS#3.
    I specifically decided to change my strategy after letting my oldest CIO at 18 months... I was back at work full time and couldn't deal with the lack of sleep anymore and I had to do something, but it was awful (the CIO night - only took one) so I did a lot of research about infant sleep before #2 was born and specifically decided on this strategy - I also made an effort to make this work from day #1, and would wake him up to put him to bed if he fell asleep in my arms or while BFing....
    We have considered letting her do cry it out but the one night we tried she cried for 2 hours and woke up everyone in the house. It seems simpler just to go and give her a warm bottle and within 5 minutes we can all be back to sleep. We are pregnant and due in Feb though so I am wondering if we should suck it up and try cry it out again before I have to be up already with a newborn.

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    Ha yeah. You couldn't put my dd down and have her fall asleep. She'd just scream and scream. She needed to be nursed or rocked for a very long time. Now she's up, nurses for 5 minutes and rolls over and goes back to sleep. I'll never let her cio, it's not for us. It would break her tiny heart and would probably last for hours.
    Last edited by Nemo; 08-25-2014 at 02:33 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Layla'sMom View Post
    We have considered letting her do cry it out but the one night we tried she cried for 2 hours and woke up everyone in the house. It seems simpler just to go and give her a warm bottle and within 5 minutes we can all be back to sleep. We are pregnant and due in Feb though so I am wondering if we should suck it up and try cry it out again before I have to be up already with a newborn.
    Since I ebf, I'd just get your hubby to deal with the toddler and I'd handle the newbie
    LaLa likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Layla'sMom View Post
    We have considered letting her do cry it out but the one night we tried she cried for 2 hours and woke up everyone in the house. It seems simpler just to go and give her a warm bottle and within 5 minutes we can all be back to sleep. We are pregnant and due in Feb though so I am wondering if we should suck it up and try cry it out again before I have to be up already with a newborn.
    Even though it worked for us, I don't actually recommend letting a baby cry it out unless it's like the LAST resort to keeping your sanity.
    It was one of the longest nights of my life, and I hated every single second of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogomom View Post
    Even though it worked for us, I don't actually recommend letting a baby cry it out unless it's like the LAST resort to keeping your sanity.
    It was one of the longest nights of my life, and I hated every single second of it.
    Yes and that was the problem. Dh was fine with letting her cry while I just wanted to go and cry with her. Now that she will be 2 in October though, it might not be as bad but I am reluctant to try it. I was hoping she just would start not needing that night bottle and stay sleeping. Sometimes she doesn't wake to have it until 5am (like last night).

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    Bribe her.

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    my daughter never really slept entire night until I stopped breastfeeding I think

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