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  1. #1
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    Default Interested in Homeschooling, but feeling overwhelmed...

    I haven't been here in a while, I thought one kid was quite the drastic change, till #2 came along, and now...just wow. That's all I can say.

    DD is almost 3.5, and would technically enroll in JK this upcoming September.

    I know I definitely want to homeschool her, but I need to talk to someone who's been there and done it.

    I've taken a look at the Ontario Federation of Teaching Parents, so I have a little bit of background, but I'm wondering about the following:

    - How do I know what curriculum to follow? What materials to use, it looks like there's a LOT out there. How do you sift through everything?

    - Any books that I could read about home schooling to prepare myself for it?

    - I know that because home schooling is primarily one on one teaching that it's more efficient. Realistically, how many hours do I need per day to home school?

    - To test or not to test?

    - What if the there is interest in college/university? How to prepare for that?

    Am I getting too ahead of myself? Do you just take it day by day?

    Anyone regret homeschooling?

    What' the biggest disadvantage of home schooling?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acaatee View Post
    How do I know what curriculum to follow? What materials to use, it looks like there's a LOT out there. How do you sift through everything?
    you can make your own curriculum if you choose, there is NO law that says we must follow a set curriculum.
    I follow a curriculum book for a small portion , I simply went to chapters and got the books for D's grade level (these are way cheaper at costco) the rest of our stuff is done in as we choose format and we use a lot of unconventional learning techniques like FB is reading/social skills etc

    - I know that because home schooling is primarily one on one teaching that it's more efficient. Realistically, how many hours do I need per day to home school?
    I do maybe 1 hr a day a day that is "school work" the rest is as it comes it IE:she ask a question that needs help answering etc

    - To test or not to test?
    I dont, there are reviews in my work books we use but thats it.

    - What if the there is interest in college/university? How to prepare for that?
    slow down thats way far away

    Am I getting too ahead of myself? Do you just take it day by day?
    just go day by day, legally your kids don't even need to register for school/ notify the board your intent to home-school till grade 1 so you can home-school for jk and sk and then decide in grade one if you want to continue.

    What' the biggest disadvantage of home schooling?
    Less breaks, idiots in society who when they see you with your kid at 3 pm say "oh no school today"

  3. #3
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    There are parent chats that happen once a month (usually at the end of the month) if you would like to get out and chat with home schoolers. They are announced on A Different Drum yahoo group. I could post here for the one in April if you would like.

    At 3.5/4 years you really need to just keep doing what you are doing, you don't need to worry about curriculum yet. Just read a lot to them and let them play, explore the world around them. You can practice letters if you want, play games, spend lots of time outside. You could check out the books by Peggy Kaye available at the library, lots of fun games for learning though they may be for when your child is a bit older kids though.

    As they grow you will find your own path, every home schooling family does things a bit different. The wonderful thing about home schooling is school fits to the needs of the specific child, not the other way around.

    Totally don't worry about college/university yet!

    Yes, take it one day at a time. Sittingpretty is right, kinder grades are optional. (well, institutional school is optional. My children have never been in school, I have never notified anyone.

    There are not too many disadvantages to home schooling. It is true that I am with my kids almost 24-7 so less breaks. My oldest daughter is 9 and now is willing to be dropped of at lessons, so I think as they get older they will venture out on their own more and maybe more breaks will come. I like my kids and don't mind being home with them. And we are busy! We are out a lot and see many people during the week....so it's not like we are together in the house ALL of the time.

    There are so many advantages!!

    You could try reading anything by John Holt.
    Last edited by momx2; 04-09-2014 at 07:45 AM.
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  4. #4
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    A friend of mine home schools her 4 children and she says they run on a set schedule and get their work done from 9-11:30am every day and then they are done. The kids do have to do reading in the afternoon and music practice, but it isn't as regimented. They also do things like baking as math lessons, etc. She also does attend a homeschooling group on Friday's where her kids attend classes there.

  5. #5
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    We have been homeschooling for about 11 yrs. Well my oldest is 11. We have 6 children so I would say we have a good level of experience.
    Curriculum: This depends on a lot. You can follow a boxed curriculum. We did this at first. It was called Sonlight. A boxed curriculum basically lays it all out for you. Tells you what to read, when and how often. You literally buy a box or two of books and there you go. You can go eclectic. This is what we do. We started with a box and then realized we didn't like some parts of it so we started looking at different subjects elsewhere. For Math there is Right Start (we use this), Abeka, MathUSee, Singapore for ex. A lot to choose from. It just depends on the way you want to teach them it. Different people teach in different ways and as you go along you will probably change things up to suit your family. Are you a Christian? A lot of programs are Christian based so that could help you sort through some. Then there is unschooling or child led learning. This is where you follow your child and their interests. We did this for a lot of yrs and it is great but with so many children I was finding it hard to stay on top of all of their interests and fostering that.
    We follow the Charlotte Mason method. We have a list of books to choose from online and generally follow that. For History and Geography we read a good book and they get the information that way. We don't do text books. In a story format it is easier for them to retain the information.

    How long to teach: I don't start schooling them until they are 6. Before that we can play games and practice some letter sounds. This is a fun time and exploring time. We don't need curriculum for this time. We teach them the basics in fun ways. At six they are more ready to get into more school. We teach as long as it takes. Math takes about 20 min for each child. We do copywork which involves a bit of spelling and writing out a few sentences so they can learn grammar, spelling, punctuation. This takes about 10-20 min. They read to me and this takes about 20 min. So about an hr in the morning. First my older 4 do their copywork together. Then 3 of them read to me. Then they do their math. So it takes me a couple of hrs in the morning but takes them about 1 hr to get finished or can take a half hr if not distracted. In the afternoon I read for about an hr out of different books. If a book mentions somewhere on the map we will go and discuss it. We are studying WW2 right now. The kids are engrossed and learning so much!

    Tests: We don't test because the purpose of a test is to see if they understand the work. You see that when you are one on one, you know what they understand.

    College/University: I don't know a lot about this yet but I do know that some colleges and universities look favorably on homeschoolers. From what I understand it isn't that hard to get in.

    Biggest disadvantage: Those days when the kids are acting crazy and you see that yellow bus come by and pick up the neighbour kids.... lol. Those parents have more time to clean their houses. I would much prefer to have my kids home with me. I love it but there are those days....

    If you PM me, I can give my phone number to you so we can chat about it. I used to be the info person around Windsor for people to call and learn about homeschooling. If you would like any more info, I can help.

  6. #6
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    If you want to follow the Ontario Curriculum for FDK, you can google Ontario curriculum. FDK doesn't really have a curriculum, but in JK children would learn to use numbers in realistic settings and understand when and why to use numbers, and count objects and recognize the numbers. They learn to recognize letters and their sounds and some basic words by memory (a, I, it). I would get some level readers, you can also purchase RazKids subscription for the year for I think $80 - it has level books, JK would be A or B, SK would move up to A, B, or C or even up to F.

    It is basically watching your child playing and finding out what they are interested in and finding how to bring reading and writing and math into it. For example, if your child likes building with blocks they can use a clipboard to draw blueprints of what they built, they can write a title and put their name on it, they can use rulers or measuring tape to measure and say the numbers, or they can use string to talk about what was longer or shorter. You can take pictures of them doing activities they like and then they can write about the picture.

    If they are into cookies, then using playdoh and shape cookie cutters and drawing pictures and talking about their favourite shape.

    The main thing they learn at school is social skills, it is one of the 6 curriculum strands.

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    Thank you so much ladies for all your replies, you're all so kind and helpful. It took me a while to reply (once again), forgive me.

    I discussed your points with DH, and we are a little more at ease.

    Our main concern is the following: I love my home, especially my kitchen; I love cooking and doing every thing from scratch, whether it's ice cream, bone broth, cheese, fermented veggies like sauerkraut, yogurt, pastrami (we rarely eat out). It takes a lot of time, so we're worried that I won't be able to achieve both home schooling and doing the things I normally do. But then again, I was thinking, with time, as my children get older, they can start helping me around the house with house chores, and hopefully things will balance themselves out, no? Or will I just learn how to manage things with time, like how I am getting better at balance DS now with DD?

    Now, there might be some opposition from family, I haven't told them yet, till I prepare myself.

    I'm trying to think of potential questions/arguements that might be posed:

    1. I'm not qualified enough.

    2. I'm not organized enough.

    3. What about socialization/interaction with other childen?

    4. I need to look after myself, by DD being in school 9 - 4, I can have time for myself and get things done.

    5. I am making my children too attached to me. Not letting them have their freedom.

    I'll think of more later...

    And thank you for your offer luckymama, pm'd you.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acaatee View Post
    Thank you so much ladies for all your replies, you're all so kind and helpful. It took me a while to reply (once again), forgive me.

    I discussed your points with DH, and we are a little more at ease.

    Our main concern is the following: I love my home, especially my kitchen; I love cooking and doing every thing from scratch, whether it's ice cream, bone broth, cheese, fermented veggies like sauerkraut, yogurt, pastrami (we rarely eat out). It takes a lot of time, so we're worried that I won't be able to achieve both home schooling and doing the things I normally do. But then again, I was thinking, with time, as my children get older, they can start helping me around the house with house chores, and hopefully things will balance themselves out, no? Or will I just learn how to manage things with time, like how I am getting better at balance DS now with DD?

    Now, there might be some opposition from family, I haven't told them yet, till I prepare myself.

    I'm trying to think of potential questions/arguements that might be posed:

    1. I'm not qualified enough.

    2. I'm not organized enough.

    3. What about socialization/interaction with other childen?

    4. I need to look after myself, by DD being in school 9 - 4, I can have time for myself and get things done.

    5. I am making my children too attached to me. Not letting them have their freedom.

    I'll think of more later...

    And thank you for your offer luckymama, pm'd you.
    I do all that. From the fermenting to the bone broths to whatever you can think of because we don't eat GMO's and it's cheaper to make GMO free foods from scratch and know for sure it's GMO free then to have to buy organic to ensure it at the store. My days are busy but it's doable. Get your tougher subjects out of the way and then do more independent work as you do other things in the kitchen. Get the kids on board. One of mine cleans the front room, the other the toy room and they both clean their bed rooms.

    1. With family - don't really engage them. Say this is what we're doing and we're excited about it. I know my FIL and his wife were a bit sceptical but time told the tale and they are quite impressed with how the kids are doing in school and who the kids are turning out to be.

    2.Me neither. I find meal planning goes a LONG way. Also in their books I make marks in order to be done at the end of the year this is where they should be at the end of Sept. Oct. etc. I didn't do that this year but I found it really motivating for them when I did that. My oldest is pretty much done her English books already for the year. She loves English and just zips through it. (I'll still have her do English but more in the form of stories and reading books and she is always constantly doing anyway) Also back to get the kids back on board to help stay organized.

    3.There are lots of Homeschool groups in London.

    4. I do it with three! work out, eat well...I don't have a lot of "me" alone time but I figure this is the season of life I am in. I want to savour it and enjoy the hustle and bustle of them at home. I don't want them to be in school all day either, how boring is that!!

    5. They have a LOT more freedom out of school IMO. What's free about an agenda for that long? My kids are outside in the afternoon, or we have the freedom to get ahead and go visit out of town family, we go see their cousins who are also homeschooled in the afternoon when they are all done their school work. They get to have their other hs'd friends for play dates and play freely not when they get the chance at school. Sometimes I even watch my sisters kids and I homeschool all of them.
    Last edited by my2babies; 04-18-2014 at 11:13 PM.

  9. #9
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    Right now, first step is I'd join a different drum and go on outings with other families who homeschool and pick their brains https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...rent_Drum/info

  10. #10
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    You're right too in thinking things get a lot easier as the kids get a bit older. I have found that for us, for sure.

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